News and Blogs

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Richard Smythe

Richard Smythe - The Artist's Print RoomIn our latest blog article featuring  our clients, we’ve spoken to freelance illustrator, Richard Smythe. We love Richard’s adorable drawings, in particular his dancing squirrels (which you can view on his website!)

When did you first discover your passion for illustration?

From a very young age I enjoyed to draw and create things. Eventually I realised art and design came more naturally to me than other subjects at school. I remember first being commended on a drawing I did at primary school. Probably the only time I was ever praised for school work, however!

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Inspiration for my illustration work comes from many sources. Usually just everyday life. Whenever I see something funny or an unusual circumstance.

How would you describe your style?

richardsmythe_dogandcatadventure
©Richard Smythe – Dog & Cat Adventures

Quite loose and naive, but representational enough for young children to understand and recognise.

What makes you different from other illustrators?

It’s hard to say but it’s probably more down to how I interpret the subject matter  in the author’s manuscript. Each illustrator comes at a project differently based on their own experiences I think.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to illustrating picture books?

Meeting a deadline. I normally schedule my time on a project before I start, but other things beyond my control get in the way which inevitably delay the project. If the picture book requires me to draw something unusual or complicated then this requires extra study or experimenting, which all has to be done under the time constraints of the deadline.

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

richardsmythe_watersong
©Richard Smythe – Water Song

I honestly don’t know. I really just love what I am fortunate enough to be doing now, which is illustrating picture books for kids. I suppose it would be nice to work on some of my own stories at some stage as I always have lots of ideas.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I had a lot of other nondescript jobs to make ends meet before I was able to make a living as an illustrator. I worked with young adults with physical and mental disabilities for the longest time though.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

mouse_cup_richardsmythe
©Richard Smythe – Mouse Cup

To carry on with what I’m doing and perhaps to have had a few more awards under my belt would be lovely.

What is your typical day like?

Very long. I get up around 6am and finish up about 6pm. I split my time between client work and personal development. As well as exercise and dog walking!

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

richardsmythe_foxbytheriver
©Richard Smythe – Fox By The River

I think the most enjoyable part is creating something out of nothing. The opportunity to interpret an author’s story is a great privilege to me. Picture books (if they’re good ones) can be passed down from generation to generation of kids, being cherished and loved forever. That’s a great thing to be part of. I suppose the main thing I dislike is not being paid on time, which can happen unfortunately.

How do you relax after a long day?

I like to read and do exercise, and just hang about with my family. 


You can find out more about Richard’s work on his website or through his social media accounts; Instagram and Twitter.

 

 

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Helen Parry

Watercolour Artist Helen ParryIn our second blog article on Meet the Artist, we’ve spoken to watercolour artist, Helen Parry and found out some fascinating information on her painting technique and what has inspired Helen over the years and what a typical day looks like…

When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

I think it is something I’ve always been able to do. When I was small, I think it was the reaction of others to anything I created, that made me realise I could do something others couldn’t. At junior school whenever we did art, the other children liked my work and asked me to paint one for them to take home. They would ask me to draw all sorts of things, sometimes I think just to see if I could do it. I think they spurred me on and as I went to senior school I realised I was the only one who was aware of drawing the reflections in objects and that objects had shade to create form.

Helen Parry
©Helen Parry

Furthermore, someone gave me a book when I was young on how to mix colours. I couldn’t understand how people didn’t instinctively know how to mix colours. Again this made me realise I had a natural ability.

I think it was realising how observant I was, that I developed a need to share this with others, who seemed to miss all the detail.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Nature is very inspiring, but I’m so observant that anything can trigger an idea. Also when you work full-time at painting, there isn’t time to wait for inspiration you just have to get on and paint.

I think that’s when I know someone is serious about art. They don’t wait for inspiration to strike, they get on with painting, trusting their creativity to shine through in the end.

How would you describe your style? 

Highly technical watercolours with fine detail brushwork. They are close to being realistic, but I don’t want my paintings to look like photographs, so there is a softness to the brushwork. 

What makes you different from other watercolour artists?

Helen Parry_Stokesay Castle GateHouse
© Helen Parry – Stokesay Castle

Firstly my paintings are not loose washes of watercolour. My watercolours have more layers of paint and fine detail brushwork too. I don’t use ready mixed watercolours. I mix all my colours from three colours a blue, a yellow and a red. I don’t use masking fluid, so all areas that are to remain white have to be carefully painted around. Also I don’t use a white paint, so all fine white hairs on leaves, flowers and even animals have to be carefully painted around. So the paper is the white, left unpainted.

Also I paint layers upon layers of watercolour, which can be difficult, because with each new layer, the under layer could wash off. It’s a balancing act.

Also I mix colours on the paper rather than in a palette, especially for portraits. I like to paint the darker undertones to a face first, which is the opposite of how you normally use watercolours (should be from light to dark). 

My technique is known as pure watercolour, but I go further by not using masking fluid and mixing my own colours from three colours. 

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

Not to try to be a perfectionist and to know when to let a painting go. It can be hard letting go of some of the detail too.

What would be your career dream?

To sell more paintings and not have to do all the promotion of my work, but have more time to paint. For my paintings to inspire people to look more closely at nature and see the wonderful detail, they overlook.

What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

I have several ideas I’d like to complete, from large scale paintings to writing stories with illustrations. 

What were you doing previously to this?

I was the financial director of an engineering company I started with my husband. 

What inspired you to go full time as an artist?

Helen Parry_Barn Owl
© Helen Parry – Barn Owl

 When you run your own business it takes every hour of your life. We ran an engineering company with a 24/7 breakdown service for many years. You don’t have time for hobbies or holidays. So as time went on, I missed being able to draw or paint or write. I missed being creative.

I saw an opportunity to help with running an after school art club at my children’s primary school. It turned out they needed someone to run it, so I went in at the deep end, finishing early at work once a week to run the art club. I ran it for two-years and it was an absolute pleasure working with the children. We created some really big projects in the school and halfway through the first year we had nearly every child at the school attending. It seemed they enjoyed it just as much as me.

It made me realise how much I’d missed painting and creating and I decided that I would pursue it as a career. It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but it was something I had to do to realise my own full potential.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years time?

I would like to have achieved more paintings, bigger projects and finally have a couple of books published. I would like to be spending more time in the hills with my backpack, painting and sketching and maybe doing talks about these painting adventures. 

What is your typical day like? 

An early morning run helps the start of my day. I run four mornings a week. It gets my mind focused for the day ahead and I always feel better for having time to myself, that no one can interrupt.

Then I start by going through emails and enquiries. I work seven days a week, so I still do this on a weekend. Next I check social media and respond to enquiries or comments. I’ll do this several times throughout the day. Then I’ll check or order art materials I need or running low on. There is a lot of paper work to sort and paintings have to be photographed and updated onto the website too.

Helen Parry_Stag in Winter
©Helen Parry – Stag in Winter

There are days when I will be out early on the hills sketching and painting composition ideas. I don’t spend a whole day out as time is precious. I tend to keep moving and sketching quickly. I will take a camera as well in case I see wildlife, they tend not to hang around long enough for me to draw.

I also have to find time in the day to do research on certain projects and identifying plants and flowers. Then I also need time for drawing out ideas for painting compositions too. I try to spend some time at the weekend writing blogs for my website as well.

The rest of my time or day is spent painting. Commission paintings take priority over other paintings, but I can have several paintings on easels at the same time. I can easily spend 8 or 9 hours a day painting, with a short break for lunch and a break for a late dinner. If I’m trying to finish a painting I will return to it, after dinner, so it could end up being a very late night. Regardless of a late night, I’m up early the next morning. 

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most? 

I love the fact I get to be creative and make my ideas a reality. I hate having to spend time promoting and doing the paperwork. 

How do you relax after a long day? 

I might sit and watch a tv show on Netflix or Amazon. I don’t have time for terrestrial television. On lighter nights through the summer, I might go for a wander up the lane or sit in the garden and watch the last rays of the sun go down.


You can keep up to date with Helen Parry’s incredible work through her social media accounts; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

To purchase any of Helen’s work, please visit her website.

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Nicky Thompson

We’ve decided to ask some of our clients a few questions, we love learning more about what and how artists are inspired. Here in our first blog post, we’ve spoken to artist Nicky Thompson.

Nicky Thompson - The Artist's Print Room
Nicky Thompson

When did you first discover your passion for art and painting/drawing/photography?

By drawing with my mum as a child, my early works were mostly bad copies of Roy of The Rovers comics.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Nature and the work of artists and illustrators I greatly admire. I especially like Singer Sargent, Barbara Hepworth, Peter Firmin, Charles Tunnicliffe, Frank Henry Mason and Ken Paine.

How would you describe your style?

I have a few styles (being mostly a commercial illustrator)…I am probably best known for my 1930’s inspired travel posters, although I love portraits (pastel/charcoal) and botanical work.

What makes you different from other artists?

Virgin Visual, Nicky Thompson - The Artist's Print Room
Virgin Trains, Nicky Thompson

I tend to have a direct style. I think this comes from my background as a commercial illustrator/designer…I like images that work viscerally. I enjoy pushing the boundaries between fine art and commercial illustration. Illustration seems to be enjoying a renaissance at the moment, with people purchasing illustration as fine art print. It’s all very exciting.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to your art?

Commercial work is difficult because you need to marry your intuition and instinct with the expectations of a client (and often the voices behind the client).

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do?

I think to leave behind a body of work that transcends the commercial requirements of a brief. I think of Charles Tunnicliffe and how those Ladybird Book illustrations did so much more than keep his client happy. They inspired awe in generations of children. That is a wonderful thing.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I briefly flirted with the idea of being footballer! However, two left feet swiftly ended this dream…I started art school at 16 and have been doing it since.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

Cheshire Life, Nicky Thompson - The Artist's Print Room
Cheshire Life, Nicky Thompson

Still drawing and creating pictures. It’s what makes me happy.

What is your typical day like?

I’m not sure I have a typical day! Tomorrow looks like this…coffee at home, drive to Chester University to deliver two-hour lecture. then a meeting afterwards with course leader. Drive to my studio, eat a sandwich in the car. Work in the afternoon (three projects need attention tomorrow). Finish work at 6pm, play racketball. Shower. Home, cook tea (maybe with a glass of wine). Read for an hour (The Magpie Murders). Watch a sit-com (Early Doors). Then sleep.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I love drawing. My day feels exactly the same as doing art at school…but all day, which is brilliant. I never take for granted how lucky I am. I don’t hate anything, although admin and invoicing is never a daily highlight.

How do you relax after a long day?

Playing racketball, cooking dinner, glass of wine and reading.


To see more of Nicky’s work you can follow him on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook.

Acrylic Mounted Prints

Here at The Artist’s Print Room, we’ve recently invested in a new laminating machine to bring you another alternative to your fine art prints, acrylic mounted prints.

Acrylic Mounted Prints

Acrylic mounted prints are an elegant, modern and minimalist way of displaying your fine art images as alternative to traditional framing techniques. In addition to this, acrylic mounts give a sophisticated dramatic and stunning impact.

Acrylic mounted prints are ideal for commercial environments – many businesses use this technique to create signage. Additionally, this form of mounting is ideal for displaying wall art in your home or exhibition images.

Your fine art print is printed as it would be when producing a traditional fine art giclée print. However, it is then bonded and sandwiched between a piece of acrylic and a backing material (select from either a 5mm white or a 10mm clear backing) this backing prevents any warping of your image occurring. The process of acrylic face mounting is complex and intricate which entails careful handling and a lot of precision. Here at The Artist’s Print Room you can trust us to get this right, each and every time. We take great care in all the products we produce which makes us unique when compared to mass production photographic labs.

The acrylic mounting gives your image a beautiful high gloss finish which is shatter proof in addition to being dust and damp proof. The final product is lightweight, however, despite this your final product is rigid and durable. Wall hanging fixings are attached to the sub-frame on the back, therefore your prints are ready to hang straight away.

You can order your prints through our easy to use step-by-step online ordering system in which you can select the substrate you would like your image printed on and also sizing options are included.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions or further information that you may require.

Win your Christmas Order!

Here at The Artist’s Print Room we are running a fantastic Christmas competition! We are giving you the chance to win the value of your Christmas order back (up to £200) – in cash! How awesome would that be?!

All you need to do to enter is to place your order as normal, whether this is your own work to be printed or as a gift. Once you’ve placed your order, head over to our Facebook or Instagram page and like, share and comment on the Christmas competition post. Perhaps you could tell us about your image and what it is of, or maybe share with us what you would do with the spare cash if you won the prize. Most importantly, don’t forget to share this incredible competition with all your friends and family too!

We will allocate a number to every entry and a lucky dip will take place. The prize winner will be drawn on the 20th December, with that refund just in time for Christmas!

All orders are to be placed between the 15th October 2018 and 17th December. This ensures there is enough time to get your order printed and dispatched in time for you to wrap and get placed under your Christmas tree!

So, what are you waiting for? Place your order today!

PrintingMountingExtras

View our competition terms and conditions here.

Fine Art Canvas Wraps

The perfect gift either for someone else, or even a treat for yourself and your home! Fine art canvas wraps are incredibly popular due to their durability and will make a wonderful addition to any home.

Fine Art Canvas Wraps
Fine Art Canvas Printing at the Artists Print Room.
Courtesy of ©Abstract Arial Photography

Canvas wraps are an incredibly popular, elegant and versatile option for displaying your images as an alternative to traditional framing techniques. Fine art canvas wraps from The Artist’s Print Room involve printing your image directly onto either the Hahnemühle Daguerre or Canson Infinity Museum Pro Canvas both of premium quality and ensuring archival qualities. Both of these canvas options have a stunning matte finish and provide an incredible image sharpness, really highlighting the colours in your print.

The canvas print is then stretched and hand wrapped precisely around wooden bars to give a taught finish. Due to the drying process of the prints, dispatch time for canvas wraps is between 7 and 10 days.

As your image is wrapped around the bars, you have various options for the sides, you can go for one solid colour, black, white or any other colour you select! Alternatively, there is the option of having your image covering the sides, select which option you would prefer through our online ordering system. You can also select from landscape, portrait or square prints, giving you so many options to may your canvas wrap truly unique. You can find more about our fine art canvas wraps and pricing here.

The best bit, all fine art canvas wraps ordered from us are ready to hang with fixings already attached to the back bar meaning you haven’t got to worry about this! This allows your print to hang flush to the wall as soon as it’s delivered and unpacked!

For further information or any questions on our fine art canvas wraps, please feel free to contact us.

 

 

Understanding Printing – Talks for art groups & photographic societies

Understanding Printing

The world of printing can be daunting, that’s why we offer talks to photographic groups and societies in addition to art clubs and groups. We can explain some of the processes behind fine art printing and workflow to give you an understanding of what goes on behind the scenes.

What does this entail?

Firstly, we will give you a brief understanding and an introduction to giclée printing including the history of the process. Additionally, we will cover the four most vital aspects of giclée printing; resolution, inks, papers and of course the printer. Furthermore, for art groups we will cover the topic of artwork reproduction photography.

Our presentation is a great opportunity to get ‘hands on’ with all the different papers and canvases that we offer. Samples of both our prints and substrates will be on display for you to see first hand.

We also cover aspects such as copyright law, the principles of Limited Edition prints, how to publicise your work on social media and also touching upon some laws and regulations you may need to be aware of.

Don’t just take our word for it though:

‘Fabulously interesting and very useful- been looking for someone that can print my work as I want it & such interesting info. So very useful to my art practice so thank you.’

‘Really useful session – full of all the things you wouldn’t think of or have time to ask!’ 

‘Very interesting technical background to colour and substrates. Interesting to me as a photographer.’

The evening will be an opportunity to bring along any of your work in addition to asking all those burning questions that you’ve never had answered before.

So, whether you’re a member or organiser of an art group or photographic club, please get in touch about our understanding printing talks and we can discuss your requirements and tailor each to the specific needs of your group.

The History of Paper

Paper is one of the most critical parts of your fine art giclée print. But what is the history of paper? Where did it all start? And how did we get to where we are now?


Ancient Egypt – 3000 B.C.

The History of Paper - The Artist's Print RoomThe first traceable knowledge of paper goes back as far as the 2nd Century, however, there are arguments to suggest the ancient Egyptians were using a form of paper in 3000 B.C. The word ‘paper’ derives from the ancient Egyptian word ‘papyrus’ which was traditionally their writing material. The ancient Egyptians would also use animal skins, soaked in water, chalk and salt to give a smooth writing surface. Before this of course, engravings were typically used to writing and drawing, typically into stone or wood.


China – 150 A.D.

Moving forward, the first recording of mass produced paper was in 150 A.D in China. Cai Lun first invented paper which was made from plant fibres. Ts’ai Lu, a Chinese court official documented the first modern paper making techniques which have developed into what we know today. These began as mulberry bark, cotton or hemp rags with water. This mixture was mashed together, flattened, pressed and left to dry in the sun. Further down the line in 610 A.D. paper making techniques were imported into both Japan and Korea. By 740 A.D. the first recording of newspaper was made in China. In the 10th Century, the first paper monetary system was recorded in China.


Europe – 13th Century

Spain was the first European country to start producing paper in 1144, closely followed by Italy. It is suggested that Marco Polo returned from China and spread knowledge that paper was being used for money. Following this, Spain was the first country in Europe to produce paper bank notes.


17th & 18th Century

Skipping forward a few centuries, paper making made some significant advances. Automation was slowly introduced with paper making machines. Additionally, bleaching of pulp was introduced by the French chemist, Claude-Louis Bertholett, giving a whiter paper tone. Due to the popularity of paper there was a shortage of raw materials, in particular, cotton rag. Thus, laws and regulations were introduced in the world of paper making.


19th & 20th Century

In 1843, Saxon Friedrich Gottlob Keller invented a wood grinding machine which consequently opened the market up to wood pulp papers. Wood pulp consequently became the leading raw material for paper production and allowed industrial scale production to meet the increasing demand. Automation really began to take hold with the preparation, pulp production, drying and packaging being done by machine. Paper was subsequently produced for more purposes including flyers and magazines.


So there is a very brief overview of the history of paper… the rest they say, is history! Paper production has come far over the centuries and there is now such a variety of papers to choose from. Paper development is a continual process with paper mills producing different styles and varieties of giclée printing papers. Find out about the papers we offer on our giclée papers and canvases page.

All about Mark & The Artist’s Print Room

 

When using a small business and their services, sometimes it’s nice to get to know more about the business and who is behind it all! Therefore, we’ve given Mark a few questions so everyone can get to know him and The Artist’s Print Room a little better!


What inspired you to set up The Artist’s Print Room?

My wife, Helen, had been trying to get her work copied and printed. She had worked with local printers and national printers, each having there own problems in capturing and reproducing her work.
Helen, couldn’t get printers to reproduce the artwork consistently, even during a print run, there would be variations. On returning from work, I found a very large crate on the door step, Helen, appeared out of the front door and said “I’m going to print my own work” and so, the rest they say, is history!

What were you doing previous to The Artist’s Print Room?

My core is I’m a fault diagnostics engineer, and for 10 years, I’d set up and run my own successful engineering business. In 2016, I left engineering behind to study my passion which was photography. As a young man, photography was not a trade. My Father had told me to get a real job in engineering, and that’s the route I took. Life, had sprung me an opportunity, and I realised I could choose my own destiny. After a few years I got the opportunity to work with a great Chef, that changed my world, I was now working in food photography. With social media now playing a greater hand, work, was not as profitable as before, therefore Helen, buying a printer came at the right time for me.


Where would you like to see The Artist’s Print Room in the next 10-15 years?


I’d like to see steady growth, not just financially, but in the reach and breath and variety of types of work my clients produce. We already have hundreds of artists and photographers from across Europe and the UK. I really hope Brexit doesn’t hamper this growth.

 


What is your typical day like?

A typical day starts at 6am, my morning coffee, computers, printers turned on and then a quick nozzle check. Setting up the packing bench and packaging all the prints ready to take to the post office, ideally I like to get this done before 9.30am. At 10am, my first client arrives, this could be an introductory meeting, collection, or colour editing session – it varies day to day! I typically see 4/5 clients per day. Then at around 5pm I start printing the days orders, this sometimes takes me through to midnight to complete. On days where a large order has to be printed or artwork photography has to be done, I will not meet with clients. Telephone enquires take up a large proportion of my day, A typical enquiry can last for 20 or so minutes.


What do you think makes TAPR different from other fine art printers?


Communication, as many people know, I can talk for Britain! But I spend great deal of my time listening and understanding my clients wants and needs, then explaining in plain English, what we can do and what is achievable. Communication to me is the most important factor for success with The Artist’s Print Room.


What do you find most enjoyable with The Artist’s Print Room?


Meeting and chatting to my clients, Listening to their problems, it’s important to me to allow my clients to talk freely, to express their thoughts and concerns. The ability to listen and understand is a powerful thing, an art of communication that has gotten lost in this digital age of social media and email.


What’s the one thing you would like everyone to know and understand about printing?


Image file quality is king! Although we have great software that can repair or alter and enlarge poor files, the basis is its still a poor image file. Start with a high resolution ultra sharp capture and the prints will be ultra sharp and have perfect colour.

What motivates you?

Development! As an engineer, (yes, I still see myself as an engineer first, it’s a way of thinking), I was always moving forward, make it better, faster, stronger and more efficient. Constant learning, constant development, constant research into new practices, new papers, new techniques, better understanding of colour management. Development, what can be done, I do NOT believe in the impossible.


What has been the most satisfying moment for you and The Artist’s Print Room?

 

Getting the Hahnemühle Certified Studio in 2017, that took me over two years of persistence. For whatever reason there were constant changing goalposts and seeing other companies certified that didn’t stock Hahnemühle papers kept me focused on achieving this. As always, I never gave in, I just dug my heels in, and drove forward. I never believed for a second that I wouldn’t achieve it at some point.

How do you relax after a long day at work?


Murder! I have a love of murder mysteries, it started with Columbo as a child, now it’s CSI, Criminal Minds or Dexter. But don’t worry, to calm my murderous thoughts, I love the outdoors, walking, climbing, just being away from everything that is man made or technological, sitting at the top of Hellvelyn in the Lake District or Tryfan in Snowdonia, on a snow capped morning, that’s where I’m at my absolute happiest.


Finally, if you had a magic wand, what three things would you like to change about the industry?


1. I would love a clear definition for Limited Editions to be in Law, nearly everybody I speak to in the industry gets this wrong.
2. Ban the sale of consumer printers, I get hundreds of calls from people who buy these machines, and then want advice from me on how to get their prints correct.
3. Ban the sale of cheap art at places like Ikea, Dunelm, B&Q, this cheap art stops professional artists and photographers from being able to sell their work at good prices that represent the work and time that goes into them.


Thank you to Mark for answering all the questions! Is there anything though that you would like to know about Mark or The Artist’s Print Room? Why not send your questions to us via Facebook!

Student Giclée Printing Services

The weather is starting to turn a little chilly and the nights are slowly drawing in. Now we are officially coming up to Autumn it’s time for students to head off to university. Some for the first time, some returning for their second or third years. Therefore it’s never too soon to start thinking about student giclée printing services.

Student Giclée Printing Services

Here at the Artist’s Print Room we understand that it can be a difficult process for students to get their work printed to an exceptional standard whether this be fine art photography, fine art or illustration. Therefore, we are here to help! We offer services to help make life that little bit easier for you especially when it comes to student giclée printing.

We offer all students 10% off all of our services. This doesn’t only include student giclée printing but also our retouching and editing services too, if required.

In addition to the 10% discount we offer on student giclée printing services, we can also provide students with a one-hour free introductory meeting. During this meeting, which specifically has students and their requirements in mind, we provide an introduction to Photoshop. Additionally, we explain colour management and calibration as well as a guide to portfolio printing. We want to be able to help you from the very beginning, from producing your first portfolio all the way through your degree to your final degree exhibition, giving you reliable and honest advice throughout with consistent support.

By working with us as a student we can also go on to help you produce your first public exhibition. We hope to build a strong relationship working alongside you and hope that you gain a valuable experience and continue to work with us through your future career.

If you are interested in our services or would like to discuss anything further, please complete this form or book here for an introductory meeting. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook too for regular competitions and news updates!