Fine Art Canvas Wraps

The perfect gift either for someone else, or even a treat for yourself and your home! Fine art canvas wraps are incredibly popular due to their durability and will make a wonderful addition to any home.

Fine Art Canvas Wraps
Fine Art Canvas Printing at the Artists Print Room.
Courtesy of ©Abstract Arial Photography

Canvas wraps are an incredibly popular, elegant and versatile option for displaying your images as an alternative to traditional framing techniques. Fine art canvas wraps from The Artist’s Print Room involve printing your image directly onto either the Hahnemühle Daguerre or Canson Infinity Museum Pro Canvas both of premium quality and ensuring archival qualities. Both of these canvas options have a stunning matte finish and provide an incredible image sharpness, really highlighting the colours in your print.

The canvas print is then stretched and hand wrapped precisely around wooden bars to give a taught finish. Due to the drying process of the prints, dispatch time for canvas wraps is between 7 and 10 days.

As your image is wrapped around the bars, you have various options for the sides, you can go for one solid colour, black, white or any other colour you select! Alternatively, there is the option of having your image covering the sides, select which option you would prefer through our online ordering system. You can also select from landscape, portrait or square prints, giving you so many options to may your canvas wrap truly unique. You can find more about our fine art canvas wraps and pricing here.

The best bit, all fine art canvas wraps ordered from us are ready to hang with fixings already attached to the back bar meaning you haven’t got to worry about this! This allows your print to hang flush to the wall as soon as it’s delivered and unpacked!

For further information or any questions on our fine art canvas wraps, please feel free to contact us.

 

 

Understanding Printing – Talks for art groups & photographic societies

Understanding Printing

The world of printing can be daunting, that’s why we offer talks to photographic groups and societies in addition to art clubs and groups. We can explain some of the processes behind fine art printing and workflow to give you an understanding of what goes on behind the scenes.

What does this entail?

Firstly, we will give you a brief understanding and an introduction to giclée printing including the history of the process. Additionally, we will cover the four most vital aspects of giclée printing; resolution, inks, papers and of course the printer. Furthermore, for art groups we will cover the topic of artwork reproduction photography.

Our presentation is a great opportunity to get ‘hands on’ with all the different papers and canvases that we offer. Samples of both our prints and substrates will be on display for you to see first hand.

We also cover aspects such as copyright law, the principles of Limited Edition prints, how to publicise your work on social media and also touching upon some laws and regulations you may need to be aware of.

Don’t just take our word for it though:

‘Fabulously interesting and very useful- been looking for someone that can print my work as I want it & such interesting info. So very useful to my art practice so thank you.’

‘Really useful session – full of all the things you wouldn’t think of or have time to ask!’ 

‘Very interesting technical background to colour and substrates. Interesting to me as a photographer.’

The evening will be an opportunity to bring along any of your work in addition to asking all those burning questions that you’ve never had answered before.

So, whether you’re a member or organiser of an art group or photographic club, please get in touch about our understanding printing talks and we can discuss your requirements and tailor each to the specific needs of your group.

Paper in focus – Textured Fine Art Papers

With so many paper options to choose from, it can always be a difficult decision of which to go for. Here we are going to look at and give you a run down of the textured fine art papers we offer.

Textured Fine Art Papers

When paper is produced in the paper mill, textured fine art papers are created with a much more coarse felt, this then produces the texture on the finished product. The surface of these papers can then highlight any texture within your image, whether that be photography or an art reproduction. These papers tend to more closely represent traditional watercolour papers with a pleasant feel adding more tactile qualities to your work.

Hahnemühle Museum Etching
Museum Etching - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle Museum Etching

This paper is mould-made and 100% cotton with a natural white colour. The etching paper features a distinct textured surface which gives a special touch, feeling like a genuine artists paper. A heavy 350gsm fine art paper which meets the highest industry standards and producing excellent colour sharpness. Due to it’s very beautiful texture, it is similar to traditional etching papers and is a great option when reproducing these prints.

Hahnemühle William Turner
©Hahnemühle William Turner
©Hahnemühle William Turner

The William Turner paper from Hahnemühle is heavily textured albeit a much finer texture when compared to the Museum Etching paper.  A 310gm mould-made paper, again similar to the Museum Etching as it is 100% cotton. The William Turner has a natural white colour and is ideal for reproductions of traditional artworks and expressive photography reproductions. The paper also offers a water resistant coating.

Canson Infinity Arches Aquarelle Rag
©Canson Infinity Aquarelle Rag

This 310gsm textured paper from Canson contains no optical brighteners. Again a mould-made paper which is 100% cotton and a natural white colour. A traditional watercolour paper with a unique surface texture and an inkjet coating. Canson Infinity Aquarelle Rag gives a unique and unrivalled character to the fine art reproduction of traditional artwork and photographs.

St Cuthberts Mill Somerset Velvet Enhanced White
somerset-velvet-surface - The Artist's Print Room
©Somerset Velvet Enhanced

Once again, a 100% cotton paper, however, this time from the St Cuthberts paper mill. A 330gsm paper with a velvet, textured surface. The texture of this paper will lift images, giving them a beautifully elegant fine art feel and ideal for both artists and photographers alike.

 

 


If you would like further guidance on any of the papers we offer, you can book a free introductory meeting. We will be able to provide samples of each of our papers for you to take a closer look at. We will even supply the tea and coffee!

 

Jargon Buster

The world of print can be a little daunting, with so many different terms and acronyms it can be hard to understand what everything actually means! Here we’ve gone through some of the key terms and phrases you may stumble across and produced this little jargon buster. Think of it as your new go to printing dictionary! If there are any that you think we may have missed or would like us to explain, please just let us know and we will continue to expand the list below. You can contact us here or submit your questions and terms via Facebook or Twitter.

Bleed – The area of printing that goes beyond the edge of the sheet after trimming.

CMYK – Four base colours that are used in printing workflow. Stands for Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Key (which is black).

Colour Cast – Unwanted colour within an image that affects either the entire print or just an area of print.

DPI – Dots per inch.

Fine Art Paper – Usually acid free and is a high quality substrate. We look into fine art paper in more detail in our previous blog article.

Gamut – Limits of shades and hues that can be displayed or printed.

GSM – Base weight of paper per square meter.

ICC – This is a set of data that characterises a colour input or output device or alternatively a colour space. This is according to standards set by the International Color Consortium. Each individual paper type/printer combination has a different ICC profile.

JPEG – This stands for Joint Photographic Experts Group – they coined this term. A lossy compression type for digital images and often the most common format type for storing and transmitting images across the internet.

Limited Edition – A print that is limited to a predetermined print quantity, as outlined on the certificate of authenticity. We will be looking into limited edition prints in a future blog post.

Long Grain and Short Grain – The fibres of the paper run parallel to the long side of the paper in long grain or parallel to the short dimension if short grain. Useful information when producing books or folded items as it can affect the quality of the crease of the fold.

Open Edition – Similar or identical prints that do not have assigned numbers.

Photo Paper – A standard go to paper choice for more day to day printing. Not as high quality as fine art paper, however, still a popular option.

Proof – Test sheet or section of a print to reveal how the final print will look. Used to ensure colours are produced accurately.

RGB – Stands for red, green and blue.

Substrate – The material the print is on, in our case this would either be paper or canvas.

TIFF – The term was created by Aldus Corporation. A lossless file format for storing images. When submitting your artwork to us for printing, we request a TIFF file with no compression.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The importance of certificates of authenticity

As an artist, it is highly likely that you want to give your customers reassurance in your product as well as protecting the integrity of your finished print. That’s where certificates of authenticity come into play. Designed to protect and authenticate your fine art prints, these certificates add a perceived layer of value and trust to your customer.

What is involved?

Typically there are a certain few things that should be featured on each certificate of authenticity, this includes;

Title of the artwork: arguably one of the most important features. What’s the name of your piece?

Artist: Again, as above, one of the most vital pieces. This if your ‘stamp’ on the certificate. Ensures your link to the work and gives you the recognition that you deserve.

The date: May seem an obvious one but it’s worthwhile at least adding the year to the certificate of authenticity.

Small image of the piece: Immediately makes the certificate of authenticity linkable to the finished print.

Certificate/print number: Particularly important if your print is part of an Certificate of Authenticity - The Artist's Print Roomedition. For example print number 1 of 500 – this information should be included on the certificates of authenticity. Each print will then have the corresponding number pencilled on to provide a pair! One certificate to one print.

Material/Printer/Inks: These are other variables that can add perceived value to your piece. By detailing the substrate printed on in addition to the quality inks, this highlights and ensures the archival qualities of your fine art print.

Finally, you, as the artist should sign the certificate.

Additionally, on our certificates of authenticity you will also find a declaration of intent, signed by both the artist and publisher.

How do certificates of authenticity benefit you?

By supplying certificates of authenticity with each of your prints you show your dedication as an artist and this can make your artwork easier to sell as well as potentially increasing the value. By having this document linked to your work, your customers can have the confidence in purchase. Sadly, there is no guaranteed way to 100% prove the piece is authentic further down the line when it comes to reselling, however, providing a certificate of authenticity provides good reassurance where possible. In addition to this, many companies, including fine art paper manufacturers and organisations such as ArtSure from the Fine Art Trade Guild offer services where you can upload details to an online register to give an extra level of confidence.

Here at The Artist’s Print Room we can provide certificates of authenticity with each print. Please contact us to discuss your particular requirements and we will be more than happy to help.

 

 

 

What is Giclée?

What is Giclée Printing and what is behind the process?

Let’s start from the beginning… Well possibly one of the best places to start is the Oxford English dictionary which gives the following definition:

“Giclée is a digital printing process in which an inkjet printer is used to produce a high-quality art print”

Another good place to start, is how do you actually pronounce it? Well, Giclée derives from the French word, ‘squirt’. However, if your French isn’t too good, you pronounce it, ‘Zeeh-clay’. The term was coined by Print Maker Jack Duganne in the early 1990’s making it still a relatively new process. Traditionally the term encapsulated the process of digital artwork reproductions and photography printing, however, as trends and technology have evolved it can now additionally include entirely digital artworks.

Simply put, the Giclée printing process involves an inkjet printer ‘squirting’ microscopic dots of pigment ink onto archival quality paper or canvas. It can be argued that Giclée printing is the highest quality of art reproduction available. 

The Giclée print process requires four aspects; resolution, inks, archival quality paper/canvas and the printer.

Resolution

Images you see on computer screens are usually at 72ppi (pixels per inch), however, for a Giclée quality print, an image must be at a minimum of 300ppi when an image is being viewed at 60cm or less distance. With a minimum of 300ppi, you are guaranteed the best quality print and ensuring your final image doesn’t appear to be ‘pixelated’.

Ink

Here at The Artist’s Print Room, we only use genuine Epson UltraChrome HDX pigment inks. These particular inks have high density levels of pigment giving you the most accurate of colour reproductions. In addition to this, the genuine Epson inks guarantee longevity when combined with the other aspects involved in the Giclée printing process.

Paper and Canvas

A vital part of the process which can also seem very daunting! With so many options to select from, the most important factor here is the archival qualities of the substrate. A fine art quality paper or canvas needs to be acid free and certified to last for at least 75-100 years. We stock the widest range of Hahnemühle Fine Art papers in the UK and you can find out more about our papers and canvases here.

Printer

A Giclée printer is very different when compared to a standard desktop inkjet printer. Typically to produce a Giclée print the printer requires at least eight different inks. Our Epson SC-P9000 printer provides the most superior quality images and can produce prints up to 44″ wide!

To find out more about our printing services please visit our Giclée Printing page.