Meet The Artist – Victoria Coleman

Happy New Year to everyone, we hope you’re settling in well and had a good start to 2019! We are continuing with our ‘Meet The Artist‘ articles this year. This week we have the talented Victoria Coleman answering some questions for us. How adorable are the dogs?!

Victoria Coleman Portrait


When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

Like most artists I loved loved painting and creating things from an early age and I was fortunate that my parents encouraged this, they even let me paint on the walls of bedroom!

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

All sorts of things inspire me, a gallery could come up with a theme or someone could commission me to paint their dog with a great idea, I’m constantly looking for new ideas on social media and the internet or even my own dogs can inspire a collection!

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

How would you describe your style?

My style is a mix between realistic and illustrative, I used to paint Disney characters and I think that has influenced my style quite a bit.

What makes you different from other artists?

I use Bristol paints which is a water based paint used by scenic artists, I work in layers building up the detail, I also used an air brush to give my work depth.

What do you think is unique selling point?

Humour, just like people animals especially dogs have a sense of humour so I like to inject that into my work occasionally, I like to think my paintings will lift your spirits and make you smile. 

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to chosen medium?

It’s not so much the medium but more the subject which I find most challenging. I do a lot of portraits so especially when I’m working on a commission it’s vital I capture the likeness and spirit of the subject which sometimes can be very difficult.

Candy Girl ©Victoria Coleman
Candy Girl ©Victoria Coleman

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to complete one day?

To have a workshop in the garden, currently I work in the kitchen which can be very frustrating sometimes, I want to be able to spread out and have lots of projects on the go all around me! Ultimately I’d like to paint my own dogs but I never seem to have time, I’m also a little afraid I won’t do them justice!

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

A prop maker, it was a great job, I worked in all sorts of fields from costume props for Star Wars and Gladiator to painting Disney sculptures for their flagship stores.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

Still alive! Both my parents died in their 50’s and I’m going to be 50 next year so if I’m still around in 10-15 years’ time I hope I’ll still be creating….in my garden workshop!

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

What is your typical day like?

I get up at 6am and check my emails and do a bit of social media marketing while having a cup of tea, I also take a moment to watch YouTube videos of other artists and business owners and try to pick up tips on how to expand my knowledge, then I take my dogs for a walk.

After everyone’s had breakfast I’ll get on with either wrapping any bought work or listing work online in my shops or photographing work to be listed. Then I need to get on with whatever artwork I have on the go, I like to be painting/ sculpting by 11 o’clock at the latest.

I love listening to crime thriller audio books when I work, the narrator Jeff Harding really gets me in the mood to paint!

After lunch I’ll carry on painting or sculpting till tea time, my lovely neighbour takes my dogs for their afternoon stroll which really helps me focus and get in the zone..

We’ve recently adopted a kitten so there’s a queue for dinner around 6pm so I’ll feed the dogs and cat then do a little more work until about 7-7.30. Then I’ll have my dinner, I might do a bit more marketing in the evening if I get a chance.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I’m happiest when I’m creating, I love the processes and the freedom to paint whatever I want and I hate never having enough time, being a small business owner means having to do everything yourself so I’m constantly having to learn new things which takes up a lot of time.

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

How do you relax after a long day?

In the evening I like to sit on the floor with a glass of wine and watch Midsummer Murders or Vera or Netflix while playing with the dogs…..lovely!


Well, we certainly believe Victoria’s paintings lift our spirits and make us smile! To view more of Victoria’s work you can visit her website, Facebook page, Instagram or Twitter accounts.

 

 

Meet the Artist – Tat Effby

In our most recent blog article series, Meet the Artist, we have spoken to hilarious cartoonist and illustrator; Tat Effby. She had us in stitches with some of her responses!

When did you first discover your passion for art and drawing?

I’ve always been a doodler but I didn’t fully commit to being a cartoonist and illustrator until about 5 years ago.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Inspiration for my cartoons comes from anything, anywhere and anyone – so just be careful what you say when I’m in ear shot because you might find yourself immortalised in a badly drawn joke.

©Tat Effby

How would you describe your style?

Inconsistent but amusingly so.

What makes you different from other watercolour artists?

I’m not as good as them.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

I’ve been known to spend a whole afternoon drawing a hand. And I find cats to be indescribably difficult to capture to my satisfaction.

©Tat Effby

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

I’m doing my dream job as a cartoonist and illustrator so I just want to keep on going, keep improving and keep trying to be funny.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I was an Advertising Copywriter and I came up with ideas and headlines for advertising campaigns, our office was kinda like Mad Men but with a West Midlands accent. It’s one of the most fun jobs you can have even if you weren’t allowed to do puns. But I’ve been making up for that over the last few years.   

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

In 10-15 years time I’d love to see myself in the mirror, wrinkle-free, but I doubt that’s going to happen.

What is your typical day like?

©Tat Effby

Lots of coffee, a run, then lots more coffee at my desk drawing. Most days are this pattern, unless I’m picking up prints from The Artists’ Print Room, in which case I get to have a lovely jaunt to countryside.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I love working from home, working for myself, getting paid to draw daft things and laughing at my own jokes.  I hate hands, but I can always put them in pockets if they’re proving too difficult to draw.

How do you relax after a long day?

I like to bake a cake and eat a lot, if not all, of it.

©Tat Effby

You can find out more about Tat and her work on the following;

Instagram : @tat_effby

Twitter: @tat_effby

Twitter: @RTBinshrewsbury

Facebook: @aloadoftat

Facebook: @roundthebendinshrewsbury

Website: tat-effby.com

 

 

Meet the Artist – Kathy Little

Kathy Little - The Artist's Print Room

In our latest Meet the Artist blog article, we speak to Kathy Little. Kathy graduated from the Royal College of Art and her paintings reflect a continued interest in capturing and expressing the innate qualities in the landscape.

When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

When I completed a three year degree in Fine Art followed by a three year post graduate course.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

I am inspired by both natural and manmade landscapes and I am interested in how they alter and reshape over the passing of time,

How would you describe your style?

©Kathy Little

I am influenced by a colour combination, a surface texture or an unusual composition or shape and make mixed media abstract paintings to reflect this interest. I use a process of layering and subtracting to invent new compositions and I do not have a fixed image in mind when I start but prefer to let the imagery develop in an intuitive and experimental way.

What makes you different from other  artists?

Vibrant colours combined with neutral tones, a mix of mediums and an individual and personal visual mark making language.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

For every one painting that I’m happy with, there are probably four that I’m not . Im rarely happy with a piece, so I keep working until I feel it’s done.

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do or complete?

Collaborating with outside agencies.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

Teaching in art schools.

©Kathy Little

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

Continuing to paint and exhibit my work.

What is your typical day like?

I like to start the day early and don’t have far to travel as I work from my studio in the garden. I have radio 4 on continually for company. Day to day tasks include keeping my  website updated, emailing, keeping up to date with the contemporary art world and reading blogs and art and design magazines.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I enjoy the challenge of constantly moving forward with my painting and sharing this experience with other like minded individuals. 

©Kathy Little

How do you relax after a long day?

Cooking and sharing a meal with family and friends.


You can view more of Kathy’s work on her website or on Instagram.

You can purchase Kathy’s Prints and Originals from her Etsy shop.

 

Meet the Artist – Live Sketcher, Cherie Jerrard

Cherie Jerrard - The Artist's Print RoomFollowing on from our recent blog article featuring Richard Smythe, in our latest, Meet the Artist blog post, we have spoken to Cherie Jerrard. Cherie is a live sketcher and some may say, the ultimate people watcher!

Starting out Cherie had a career in fashion, having studied in the industry for 20 years, including a nine year career as a fashion designer and illustrator. Having grown up in the 80’s Cherie became entranced by fashion icons and the onslaught of idealistic graphic imagery. Later on having relocated from London to the beautiful town of Shrewsbury, she undertook a Masters in Illustration at Manchester School of Art.

During this time, Cherie slowly woke up and looked around to discover people are so much more imaginative and imperfect. Real everyday people are far more worthy of capturing in an illustration than someone who has been constructed by a team of people which she had previously experienced in the fashion industry.

soho coffee third edition - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Soho Coffee

Whilst studying for her Masters degree, Cherie entered a competition by Moleskine; the stationery brand. This competition was based on reportage style illustrations and she was fortunate to getting into the final round. At this point, Cherie realised and believed there could be something more to sketching. Further on, Cherie was sponsored by the German pen brand, Lamy and publishes a newspaper known as ‘Everyday Reportage’.

The majority of Cherie’s work is now undertaken on location and in the moment, ensuring her sketches are honest and simple. Often her work happens whilst sitting in coffee shops, enjoying the ‘cafe culture’ and incorporating a wide range of individuals as subjects. In addition to this, these scenarios are perfect for observing peoples natural behaviour and provide an ‘honest, authentic, context to the drawings’.

Saturday Afternoon - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Saturday Afternoon

Cherie describes her art as ‘an antidote to celebrity culture overload. The illustrations are observations of our times. My focus is to capture what it was like to come together with an unscripted group of people in any given venue and time. Something about the the actors and the stage of everyday life makes me want to document the moment. It’s the closest I can get to pausing time. Who needs celebrities we are all amazing originals.’

We love Cherie’s quirky, contemporary and endearing illustrations and you can view more of her work on her website. Alternatively, keep up to date with Cherie through her Instagram and Twitter accounts. Cherie’s work can be purchased through Cherie did this. 

Cherie Jerard_andina - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Andina

 

 

 

 

Acrylic Mounted Prints

Here at The Artist’s Print Room, we’ve recently invested in a new laminating machine to bring you another alternative to your fine art prints, acrylic mounted prints.

Acrylic Mounted Prints

Acrylic mounted prints are an elegant, modern and minimalist way of displaying your fine art images as alternative to traditional framing techniques. In addition to this, acrylic mounts give a sophisticated dramatic and stunning impact.

Acrylic mounted prints are ideal for commercial environments – many businesses use this technique to create signage. Additionally, this form of mounting is ideal for displaying wall art in your home or exhibition images.

Your fine art print is printed as it would be when producing a traditional fine art giclée print. However, it is then bonded and sandwiched between a piece of acrylic and a backing material (select from either a 5mm white or a 10mm clear backing) this backing prevents any warping of your image occurring. The process of acrylic face mounting is complex and intricate which entails careful handling and a lot of precision. Here at The Artist’s Print Room you can trust us to get this right, each and every time. We take great care in all the products we produce which makes us unique when compared to mass production photographic labs.

The acrylic mounting gives your image a beautiful high gloss finish which is shatter proof in addition to being dust and damp proof. The final product is lightweight, however, despite this your final product is rigid and durable. Wall hanging fixings are attached to the sub-frame on the back, therefore your prints are ready to hang straight away.

You can order your prints through our easy to use step-by-step online ordering system in which you can select the substrate you would like your image printed on and also sizing options are included.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions or further information that you may require.

Fine Art Canvas Wraps

The perfect gift either for someone else, or even a treat for yourself and your home! Fine art canvas wraps are incredibly popular due to their durability and will make a wonderful addition to any home.

Fine Art Canvas Wraps
Fine Art Canvas Printing at the Artists Print Room.
Courtesy of ©Abstract Arial Photography

Canvas wraps are an incredibly popular, elegant and versatile option for displaying your images as an alternative to traditional framing techniques. Fine art canvas wraps from The Artist’s Print Room involve printing your image directly onto either the Hahnemühle Daguerre or Canson Infinity Museum Pro Canvas both of premium quality and ensuring archival qualities. Both of these canvas options have a stunning matte finish and provide an incredible image sharpness, really highlighting the colours in your print.

The canvas print is then stretched and hand wrapped precisely around wooden bars to give a taught finish. Due to the drying process of the prints, dispatch time for canvas wraps is between 7 and 10 days.

As your image is wrapped around the bars, you have various options for the sides, you can go for one solid colour, black, white or any other colour you select! Alternatively, there is the option of having your image covering the sides, select which option you would prefer through our online ordering system. You can also select from landscape, portrait or square prints, giving you so many options to may your canvas wrap truly unique. You can find more about our fine art canvas wraps and pricing here.

The best bit, all fine art canvas wraps ordered from us are ready to hang with fixings already attached to the back bar meaning you haven’t got to worry about this! This allows your print to hang flush to the wall as soon as it’s delivered and unpacked!

For further information or any questions on our fine art canvas wraps, please feel free to contact us.

 

 

The History of Paper

Paper is one of the most critical parts of your fine art giclée print. But what is the history of paper? Where did it all start? And how did we get to where we are now?


Ancient Egypt – 3000 B.C.

The History of Paper - The Artist's Print RoomThe first traceable knowledge of paper goes back as far as the 2nd Century, however, there are arguments to suggest the ancient Egyptians were using a form of paper in 3000 B.C. The word ‘paper’ derives from the ancient Egyptian word ‘papyrus’ which was traditionally their writing material. The ancient Egyptians would also use animal skins, soaked in water, chalk and salt to give a smooth writing surface. Before this of course, engravings were typically used to writing and drawing, typically into stone or wood.


China – 150 A.D.

Moving forward, the first recording of mass produced paper was in 150 A.D in China. Cai Lun first invented paper which was made from plant fibres. Ts’ai Lu, a Chinese court official documented the first modern paper making techniques which have developed into what we know today. These began as mulberry bark, cotton or hemp rags with water. This mixture was mashed together, flattened, pressed and left to dry in the sun. Further down the line in 610 A.D. paper making techniques were imported into both Japan and Korea. By 740 A.D. the first recording of newspaper was made in China. In the 10th Century, the first paper monetary system was recorded in China.


Europe – 13th Century

Spain was the first European country to start producing paper in 1144, closely followed by Italy. It is suggested that Marco Polo returned from China and spread knowledge that paper was being used for money. Following this, Spain was the first country in Europe to produce paper bank notes.


17th & 18th Century

Skipping forward a few centuries, paper making made some significant advances. Automation was slowly introduced with paper making machines. Additionally, bleaching of pulp was introduced by the French chemist, Claude-Louis Bertholett, giving a whiter paper tone. Due to the popularity of paper there was a shortage of raw materials, in particular, cotton rag. Thus, laws and regulations were introduced in the world of paper making.


19th & 20th Century

In 1843, Saxon Friedrich Gottlob Keller invented a wood grinding machine which consequently opened the market up to wood pulp papers. Wood pulp consequently became the leading raw material for paper production and allowed industrial scale production to meet the increasing demand. Automation really began to take hold with the preparation, pulp production, drying and packaging being done by machine. Paper was subsequently produced for more purposes including flyers and magazines.


So there is a very brief overview of the history of paper… the rest they say, is history! Paper production has come far over the centuries and there is now such a variety of papers to choose from. Paper development is a continual process with paper mills producing different styles and varieties of giclée printing papers. Find out about the papers we offer on our giclée papers and canvases page.

Artwork Reproduction Photography

Artwork reproduction – turning your original art into stunning, true giclée prints!

There are only so many pieces of original art that you can create in one lifetime. With artwork reproduction you can have one piece created as many times as you like sharing your work near and far thus making your artwork ideal for resale. All artworks can be reproduced, including; watercolour, pastel, oil, illustration or acrylic. Even 3D sculptures can be captured and produced as a fine art giclée print.

Artwork Reproduction Services

When it comes to reproducing your original artwork the first and most vital step in the process is the image capture. Artwork reproduction photography is a specialist process which requires outstanding accuracy and a thorough understanding of colour workflows. So, if you are looking to reproduce your original artwork to sell we offer a professional artwork reproduction photography service with an exceptional reputation for attention to detail. Using our vast experience, understanding and specialist equipment, we can capture the subtle hues and fine details in your original artwork. This is extremely important as any fine details missed in this process will subsequently be missing from your final fine art giclée print. We have experience in handling delicate artworks, so you can be assured your original will always be in safe hands with us.

Soft Proofing Set-Up – The Artist’s Print Room

With our custom-built artwork reproduction photography set up the final file of each piece of artwork we photograph is a massive two-times the size of the original piece. With the incredibly large file size it ensures that there is an incredible high-colour depth, all minute details included, full tonal range and perfect accuracy. For example, a typical 16” x 12” original piece will produce an image file of 160mp and an immense 900mb (16bit) at 300ppi. Consequently, this will then produce a final giclée print of 36” x 24” at 300dpi without any additional enlargement or distortion.

View our artwork reproduction photography page for further information and to start your order.

 

Paper in focus – Gloss Fine Art Papers

So, here we will run through the gloss fine art papers we offer in addition to the textured and smooth fine art papers previously looked at.

Gloss Fine Art Papers

The most important thing to be aware of here when considering a gloss fine art paper is that when we talk about gloss, this tends to be more of a subtle lustre or satin finish. Not the high gloss on your standard photographic prints that you get produced. These finishes are much more subtle and arguably more exquisitely beautiful.

Canson® Infinity Platine Fibre Rag
Canson Platine Rag - The Artist's Print Room
©Canson Infinity Platine Fibre Rag

The Canson® Infinity Platine Fibre Rag is a combination of the combination of the premium 100% cotton Platinum paper that Canson has supplied for many years to the original Platinum and Platine photographic market, with the latest microporous coating. The paper contains no optical brighteners, thus not affecting the longevity of the print. An excellent choice of paper for both black and white or colour images. A 310gsm which overall provides a stunning satin finish to your image.

 

Hahnemühle PhotoRag Satin
Photo Rag Satin - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle Photo Rag Satin

As above, this paper from but from Hahnemühle is a 310gsm,  and has a satin finish. A smooth surface and 100% cotton rag, the paper has a lovely natural white tone. A unique paper in that when you image is printed on this paper, the unprinted areas remain matt, however, the printed areas have a slight sheen. Your image almost shimmers in the light.

Hahnemühle FineArt Pearl
FineArt Pearl - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle FineArt Pearl

The Hahnemühle FineArt Pearl is a 285gsm paper and provides your prints with a sensational pearl finish. This paper isn’t cotton rag like others previously mentioned, it’s a 100% a-cellulose paper (which is wood pulp) and has a bright white tone. Due to this bright white, prints will have impressive colour contrasts and the black in your images will have an incredible depth.

Hahnemühle PhotoRag Baryta
Photo Rag Baryta - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta

Photo Rag Baryta is a 315gsm, 100% cotton paper and the ‘glossiest’ paper we offer. Using barium sulphate in the inkjet coating, ensuring the typical gloss that makes this paper a genuine replacement for traditional Baryta papers from analogue labs. The coating on this paper provides a water resistance and the tone of the base paper lends well to black and white prints.

 

 

 


Remember, if you would like any further guidance on any of the papers we offer, you can book a free introductory meeting. We will be able to provide samples of each of our papers for you to take a closer look at. The offer of tea or coffee is still there too!

 

 

 

Paper in focus – Smooth Fine Art Papers

So previously we looked at textured fine art papers, but how about smooth fine art papers? All the papers listed below have a matte finish, we will look at the satin/gloss papers in a future post.

Smooth Fine Art Papers

When paper is produced in the paper mill, smooth fine art papers are created with a much more smooth felt in comparison to the textured papers, this then produces the surface on the finished product. A smooth fine art paper can often be a good go to when just starting out or often used with portrait photography. It’s important to remember that when a paper is described as smooth it is not completely devoid of texture though!

Hahnemühle Bamboo
Hahnemühle Bamboo - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle Bamboo

This Bamboo paper is made from 90% bamboo fibres and the additional 10% is made from cotton. More environmentally friendly than the cotton papers due to the fast growing bamboo, this paper has a lovely warm white colour to it. Due to it’s tone, it is ideal for warm coloured prints and monochrome images.

Canson® Infinity Rag Photographique 310gsm
anson® Infinity Rag Photographique 310gsm - The Artist's Print Room
©Canson Infinity Rag Photographique

This paper from Canson is 100% cotton and has an exceptional smooth white tone. During the manufacturing process, natural minerals are added and therefore give this tone to the paper. A very unique, smooth surface, however, there is still a tactile element to the paper which you can see in the close up image. This paper provides one of the highest achievable Dmax on the market, therefore making it a perfect solution for both fine art photography prints and art reproductions.

Hahnemühle Photo Rag Bright White
hahnemuehle photorag bright white - The Artist's Print Room
©Hahnemühle Photo Rag Bright White

Hahnemühle’s most famous paper is probably their Photo Rag and this paper is a brighter version of their Photo Rag 308gsm. As above, a 100% cotton paper but with a bright white tone. A smooth surface, this paper can really make your colours ‘pop’ and really add definition to black and white imagery.

 

 

 

 


Don’t forget, if you would like further guidance on any of the papers we offer, you can book a free introductory meeting. We will be able to provide samples of each of our papers for you to take a closer look at. We will even supply the tea and coffee!