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What’s difference between TIFF and JPEG?

What’s difference between TIFF and JPEG?

JPEG (pronounced jay-peg) is an acronym for Joint Photographic Experts Group, it is a lossy file format. The term “lossy” is used to describe a mathematical process that produces a smaller, more manageable file that is not identical to the original. Each time an image is saved as a JPEG, information is compressed, and when the image is re-opened, the data that is opened is based on the compressed information. Some of the original information is lost along the way. For this reason, the JPEG file format is not good for image editing, although it can be a good format for output to various printing devices and for web uploads.

Alternatively, TIFF is an acronym for Tag(ged) Image File Format. It is a loss less file format and one of the most popular and flexible of the current public file formats. Fine print uses TIFF files for printing and we request that customers send us files in TIFF format. TIFFs are the file format most frequently used when saving an image after editing in Photoshop (when the ultimate purpose for the image is output to a printer). TIFF files are larger than JPEG files, and for that reason, aren’t used in digital camera capture.