News and Blogs

Wildlife Artist of the Year – David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation

The renowned annual Wildlife Artist of the Year competition is open again for 2019, however, you’ll have to get your entries in quick with the closing date as 5pm Monday 18th February.

This prestigious competition brings together artists, both professional and amateur, from all over the world to collaboratively celebrate the diverse beauty and wonder that the world of wildlife brings us. The competition first began in 2008 and over the years has attracted more than 10,000 entries, raising critical funds for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation.

Upon the closing date a panel of judges will narrow down the selection for a final shortlist. All those shortlisted will be displayed at the public exhibition held at The Mall Galleries in London between the 29th May and the 2nd June 2019. Artwork will also be for sale during the exhibition.

There are seven categories in this years competition;

  • Earth’s Wild Beauty;
  • Animal Behaviour;
  • Into the Blue;
  • Urban Wildlife;
  • Vanishing Fast;
  • Wings; and
  • Human Impact

Each category winner will receive a prize of £500.

There also additional awards;

  • The Overall Winner will be awarded a prize of £10,000!
  • Second Place will be awarded a prize of £1,000.
  • People’s Choice. Each visitor to the Mall Galleries exhibition will vote for their favourite piece, subsequently, the winner will be awarded £500.
  • The Artist Award will be selected by The Artist magazine. The winner of this award will then be given a profile feature in their publication.

To enter, you must upload a digital file of your artwork to the Wildlife Artist of the Year website as a high res file. You can find full terms and conditions including more information and the entry fee on their website here. You can also view previous winners work there too. So if you’ve got a stunning piece you’ve been thinking about entering into competitions, why not give this fabulous and worthwhile competition a go?

 

 

The Importance of Accurate Image Capture

As an artist, it’s most likely that you need to have an element of image capture in your work processes in order to be able to reproduce your artwork. Accurate image capture is something that should never be underestimated. It’s important to remember that your finished print will only ever be as good as the digital file; the scan or photograph of your original piece.

Image Capture

To capture all the beautiful hues and fine detail in your original, the most important thing is that you have an inital high resolution digital file. Using our vast experience, understanding and specialist equipment, we can capture the subtle hues, fine details and brush strokes in your original artwork through the process of artwork photography. Meticulous handling and understanding is required as it is extremely important that any fine details are not missed as these will subsequently be missing from your final fine art giclée print. Image files can be obtained through scanning your work or alternatively through photography. This process can be very difficult to undertake at home due to the extensive equipment required.

File Size

Here at The Artist’s Print Room, the final file of each piece of artwork we photograph is a massive two-times the size of the original piece. With the incredibly large file size it ensures that there is a high-colour depth, all intricate details included, full tonal range and perfect accuracy. For example, a typical 16” x 12” original piece will produce an image file of 160mp and a immense 900mb (16bit) at 300dpi. Consequently, this will then produce a final giclée print of 36” x 24” at 300dpi without any additional enlargement or distortion.

Specialist Set Up

Some artworks can be particularly difficult to photography, for example dark oil paintings or paintings with a vast amount of texture, however, our specialist set up allows us to control lighting, ensuring we are not capturing any glare which could distort the final print.

To find out more about our Artwork Reproduction Services please take a look at our dedicated page or alternatively, contact us for more information or any questions you may have.

 

 

 

 

 

6 reasons why should you use a fine art printing company

As an artist or photographer, there is always the option of taking any printing requirements you have in house and completing this process yourself. This can be a daunting experience and often you’re left wondering, where to start? However, why not let that hassle be taken away? Of course, we believe you should use a fine art printer for your work whether you’re a photographer or an artist, but here are 6 reasons why we truly believe this is the best and most convenient way of producing your art.

1. Real, honest and bespoke advice

We see thousands of pieces of artwork and photography every single year, therefore we believe we are in the best place to give you honest and truthful advice when you need it. Experience and knowledge comes from our involvement over the years. We can assist in colour correction and advise on how it is best to print your artwork or photography.

2. Knowledge and understanding of colour and workflow processes

Printing is our day job! Why waste time having to solve the problems yourself? We’ve probably encountered the issue before so can generally have a quick fix with any technological problems. Spending time on understanding printers and colour calibration is not what you really want to be doing. Giving you more time to create your beautiful artwork. Also, we are the only print studio in the UK to be certified by the three biggest paper manufacturers; Hahnemühle FineArt, Canson Infinity and Epson Digigraphie consequently proving our expertise in the industry.

3. Options – and lots of them!

Why spend a fortune on purchasing different types of paper? You may want to use different papers for your different subjects; which can be an expensive overhead. We have an extensive variety in stock at all times so we guarantee you will be able to find the perfect paper for your print when ordering with us. Also, if you need advice or guidance on selecting the best substrate for your print, just ask! We will always be more than happy to help. We use the best quality materials and inks and the cost savings of this are passed on to you. Additionally, it’s unlikely for most people to invest in printers that can produce fine art prints much bigger than A3, therefore by using a fine art printing you are not limited in your print size. Our printers here at The Artist’s Print Room go up to 44″ wide!

4. Technical knowledge

Sometimes, printing isn’t a straight forward process. We’ve all had the dreaded paper jam! But imagine that with heavenly but expensive fine art paper – we take care of all those pesky handling issues that you could encounter when printing at home. In addition to this, we are meticulous about colour and calibration – ensuring that our systems are working accurately. This is a time consuming process which we take care of. Our business is print, therefore we aim to always stay ahead of trends and new technologies.

5. Care and understanding

Our passion is stunning art and photography, therefore, we understand how important it is to get the final print perfect every time. We care greatly that you will be more than satisfied with the finished product and endeavour to spend as much time as it takes to get each print right, every single time. You may be able to produce prints at home, but sometimes you can’t get them just quite right. Again, this is where we can assist in taking that pressure off you.

6. Ease and convenience

Probably one of the biggest benefits! When using a fine art printer, we can do everything for you. You can purchase a stunning mounted or framed print from us. This ensures your final piece is ready to hang as soon as it’s delivered to you. Our simple online ordering form allows you to work through all the printing options we have in an easy step-by-step process. Therefore, once your print has been ordered, you can sit back and relax until it arrives!


Overall, not only are you purchasing a final print from us,  you’re investing in many years of our expertise and experience. So overall, there are our top 6 reasons why we believe you should use a fine art printer for both your art reproductions and photography printing requirements. What other struggles do you see in printing your own work at home? Let us know and we would love to be able to show you how we can help!

Meet The Artist – Victoria Coleman

Happy New Year to everyone, we hope you’re settling in well and had a good start to 2019! We are continuing with our ‘Meet The Artist‘ articles this year. This week we have the talented Victoria Coleman answering some questions for us. How adorable are the dogs?!

Victoria Coleman Portrait


When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

Like most artists I loved loved painting and creating things from an early age and I was fortunate that my parents encouraged this, they even let me paint on the walls of bedroom!

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

All sorts of things inspire me, a gallery could come up with a theme or someone could commission me to paint their dog with a great idea, I’m constantly looking for new ideas on social media and the internet or even my own dogs can inspire a collection!

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

How would you describe your style?

My style is a mix between realistic and illustrative, I used to paint Disney characters and I think that has influenced my style quite a bit.

What makes you different from other artists?

I use Bristol paints which is a water based paint used by scenic artists, I work in layers building up the detail, I also used an air brush to give my work depth.

What do you think is unique selling point?

Humour, just like people animals especially dogs have a sense of humour so I like to inject that into my work occasionally, I like to think my paintings will lift your spirits and make you smile. 

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to chosen medium?

It’s not so much the medium but more the subject which I find most challenging. I do a lot of portraits so especially when I’m working on a commission it’s vital I capture the likeness and spirit of the subject which sometimes can be very difficult.

Candy Girl ©Victoria Coleman
Candy Girl ©Victoria Coleman

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to complete one day?

To have a workshop in the garden, currently I work in the kitchen which can be very frustrating sometimes, I want to be able to spread out and have lots of projects on the go all around me! Ultimately I’d like to paint my own dogs but I never seem to have time, I’m also a little afraid I won’t do them justice!

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

A prop maker, it was a great job, I worked in all sorts of fields from costume props for Star Wars and Gladiator to painting Disney sculptures for their flagship stores.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

Still alive! Both my parents died in their 50’s and I’m going to be 50 next year so if I’m still around in 10-15 years’ time I hope I’ll still be creating….in my garden workshop!

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

What is your typical day like?

I get up at 6am and check my emails and do a bit of social media marketing while having a cup of tea, I also take a moment to watch YouTube videos of other artists and business owners and try to pick up tips on how to expand my knowledge, then I take my dogs for a walk.

After everyone’s had breakfast I’ll get on with either wrapping any bought work or listing work online in my shops or photographing work to be listed. Then I need to get on with whatever artwork I have on the go, I like to be painting/ sculpting by 11 o’clock at the latest.

I love listening to crime thriller audio books when I work, the narrator Jeff Harding really gets me in the mood to paint!

After lunch I’ll carry on painting or sculpting till tea time, my lovely neighbour takes my dogs for their afternoon stroll which really helps me focus and get in the zone..

We’ve recently adopted a kitten so there’s a queue for dinner around 6pm so I’ll feed the dogs and cat then do a little more work until about 7-7.30. Then I’ll have my dinner, I might do a bit more marketing in the evening if I get a chance.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I’m happiest when I’m creating, I love the processes and the freedom to paint whatever I want and I hate never having enough time, being a small business owner means having to do everything yourself so I’m constantly having to learn new things which takes up a lot of time.

©Victoria Coleman
©Victoria Coleman

How do you relax after a long day?

In the evening I like to sit on the floor with a glass of wine and watch Midsummer Murders or Vera or Netflix while playing with the dogs…..lovely!


Well, we certainly believe Victoria’s paintings lift our spirits and make us smile! To view more of Victoria’s work you can visit her website, Facebook page, Instagram or Twitter accounts.

 

 

Meet the Artist – Tat Effby

In our most recent blog article series, Meet the Artist, we have spoken to hilarious cartoonist and illustrator; Tat Effby. She had us in stitches with some of her responses!

When did you first discover your passion for art and drawing?

I’ve always been a doodler but I didn’t fully commit to being a cartoonist and illustrator until about 5 years ago.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Inspiration for my cartoons comes from anything, anywhere and anyone – so just be careful what you say when I’m in ear shot because you might find yourself immortalised in a badly drawn joke.

©Tat Effby

How would you describe your style?

Inconsistent but amusingly so.

What makes you different from other watercolour artists?

I’m not as good as them.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

I’ve been known to spend a whole afternoon drawing a hand. And I find cats to be indescribably difficult to capture to my satisfaction.

©Tat Effby

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

I’m doing my dream job as a cartoonist and illustrator so I just want to keep on going, keep improving and keep trying to be funny.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I was an Advertising Copywriter and I came up with ideas and headlines for advertising campaigns, our office was kinda like Mad Men but with a West Midlands accent. It’s one of the most fun jobs you can have even if you weren’t allowed to do puns. But I’ve been making up for that over the last few years.   

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

In 10-15 years time I’d love to see myself in the mirror, wrinkle-free, but I doubt that’s going to happen.

What is your typical day like?

©Tat Effby

Lots of coffee, a run, then lots more coffee at my desk drawing. Most days are this pattern, unless I’m picking up prints from The Artists’ Print Room, in which case I get to have a lovely jaunt to countryside.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I love working from home, working for myself, getting paid to draw daft things and laughing at my own jokes.  I hate hands, but I can always put them in pockets if they’re proving too difficult to draw.

How do you relax after a long day?

I like to bake a cake and eat a lot, if not all, of it.

©Tat Effby

You can find out more about Tat and her work on the following;

Instagram : @tat_effby

Twitter: @tat_effby

Twitter: @RTBinshrewsbury

Facebook: @aloadoftat

Facebook: @roundthebendinshrewsbury

Website: tat-effby.com

 

 

Meet the Artist – Kathy Little

Kathy Little - The Artist's Print Room

In our latest Meet the Artist blog article, we speak to Kathy Little. Kathy graduated from the Royal College of Art and her paintings reflect a continued interest in capturing and expressing the innate qualities in the landscape.

When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

When I completed a three year degree in Fine Art followed by a three year post graduate course.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

I am inspired by both natural and manmade landscapes and I am interested in how they alter and reshape over the passing of time,

How would you describe your style?

©Kathy Little

I am influenced by a colour combination, a surface texture or an unusual composition or shape and make mixed media abstract paintings to reflect this interest. I use a process of layering and subtracting to invent new compositions and I do not have a fixed image in mind when I start but prefer to let the imagery develop in an intuitive and experimental way.

What makes you different from other  artists?

Vibrant colours combined with neutral tones, a mix of mediums and an individual and personal visual mark making language.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

For every one painting that I’m happy with, there are probably four that I’m not . Im rarely happy with a piece, so I keep working until I feel it’s done.

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do or complete?

Collaborating with outside agencies.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

Teaching in art schools.

©Kathy Little

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

Continuing to paint and exhibit my work.

What is your typical day like?

I like to start the day early and don’t have far to travel as I work from my studio in the garden. I have radio 4 on continually for company. Day to day tasks include keeping my  website updated, emailing, keeping up to date with the contemporary art world and reading blogs and art and design magazines.

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

I enjoy the challenge of constantly moving forward with my painting and sharing this experience with other like minded individuals. 

©Kathy Little

How do you relax after a long day?

Cooking and sharing a meal with family and friends.


You can view more of Kathy’s work on her website or on Instagram.

You can purchase Kathy’s Prints and Originals from her Etsy shop.

 

Meet the Artist – Live Sketcher, Cherie Jerrard

Cherie Jerrard - The Artist's Print RoomFollowing on from our recent blog article featuring Richard Smythe, in our latest, Meet the Artist blog post, we have spoken to Cherie Jerrard. Cherie is a live sketcher and some may say, the ultimate people watcher!

Starting out Cherie had a career in fashion, having studied in the industry for 20 years, including a nine year career as a fashion designer and illustrator. Having grown up in the 80’s Cherie became entranced by fashion icons and the onslaught of idealistic graphic imagery. Later on having relocated from London to the beautiful town of Shrewsbury, she undertook a Masters in Illustration at Manchester School of Art.

During this time, Cherie slowly woke up and looked around to discover people are so much more imaginative and imperfect. Real everyday people are far more worthy of capturing in an illustration than someone who has been constructed by a team of people which she had previously experienced in the fashion industry.

soho coffee third edition - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Soho Coffee

Whilst studying for her Masters degree, Cherie entered a competition by Moleskine; the stationery brand. This competition was based on reportage style illustrations and she was fortunate to getting into the final round. At this point, Cherie realised and believed there could be something more to sketching. Further on, Cherie was sponsored by the German pen brand, Lamy and publishes a newspaper known as ‘Everyday Reportage’.

The majority of Cherie’s work is now undertaken on location and in the moment, ensuring her sketches are honest and simple. Often her work happens whilst sitting in coffee shops, enjoying the ‘cafe culture’ and incorporating a wide range of individuals as subjects. In addition to this, these scenarios are perfect for observing peoples natural behaviour and provide an ‘honest, authentic, context to the drawings’.

Saturday Afternoon - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Saturday Afternoon

Cherie describes her art as ‘an antidote to celebrity culture overload. The illustrations are observations of our times. My focus is to capture what it was like to come together with an unscripted group of people in any given venue and time. Something about the the actors and the stage of everyday life makes me want to document the moment. It’s the closest I can get to pausing time. Who needs celebrities we are all amazing originals.’

We love Cherie’s quirky, contemporary and endearing illustrations and you can view more of her work on her website. Alternatively, keep up to date with Cherie through her Instagram and Twitter accounts. Cherie’s work can be purchased through Cherie did this. 

Cherie Jerard_andina - The Artist's Print Room
©Cherie Jerrard – Andina

 

 

 

 

There’s still time to place your Christmas orders!

Christmas Gift Ideas

We’re starting to feel very festive here at The Artist’s Print Room, particularly due to all the beautiful Christmas cards we’ve recently been printing! But have you yet to start or even finish your Christmas shopping? Well with just over 20 days left till the big day and that special visitor, why not treat the artist or photographer in your life to an Artist’s Print Room gift voucher? We offer gift vouchers for any value between £25.00 and £500.00 – Making it the perfect gift for those loved ones of yours! These can be redeemed on any of our services including regular giclée printing, mounting, or even artwork photography. Find out about all the services we offer here.

Last Order Dates

To ensure any orders you place are delivered before Christmas, a full list of our last order dates for delivery in time for Christmas can be found here. However, in summary, for delivery to mainland UK, please order any giclée prints, by the end of the 17th December. For other prints which include mounting such as; Canvas Wraps, Acrylic Mounting, MDF mounting or Foam Core Mounting, please get your order to us by the 10th December to guarantee delivery for the big day (and still giving you time to get the gift wrapped too!) If you are outside mainland UK delivery times may vary – you can find further information here. If you have any questions about these order dates or if you’re after any other information about our services, please feel free to contact us.

Please note that any orders placed after the 18th December will be dispatched during the week of the 8th January.


We would like to take this opportunity to thank all of our customers for their support during 2018 and we wish you all a very Merry Christmas and best wishes for the new year. We hope to see you all again in 2019!

 

 

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Richard Smythe

Richard Smythe - The Artist's Print RoomIn our latest blog article featuring  our clients, we’ve spoken to freelance illustrator, Richard Smythe. We love Richard’s adorable drawings, in particular his dancing squirrels (which you can view on his website!)

When did you first discover your passion for illustration?

From a very young age I enjoyed to draw and create things. Eventually I realised art and design came more naturally to me than other subjects at school. I remember first being commended on a drawing I did at primary school. Probably the only time I was ever praised for school work, however!

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Inspiration for my illustration work comes from many sources. Usually just everyday life. Whenever I see something funny or an unusual circumstance.

How would you describe your style?

richardsmythe_dogandcatadventure
©Richard Smythe – Dog & Cat Adventures

Quite loose and naive, but representational enough for young children to understand and recognise.

What makes you different from other illustrators?

It’s hard to say but it’s probably more down to how I interpret the subject matter  in the author’s manuscript. Each illustrator comes at a project differently based on their own experiences I think.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to illustrating picture books?

Meeting a deadline. I normally schedule my time on a project before I start, but other things beyond my control get in the way which inevitably delay the project. If the picture book requires me to draw something unusual or complicated then this requires extra study or experimenting, which all has to be done under the time constraints of the deadline.

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

richardsmythe_watersong
©Richard Smythe – Water Song

I honestly don’t know. I really just love what I am fortunate enough to be doing now, which is illustrating picture books for kids. I suppose it would be nice to work on some of my own stories at some stage as I always have lots of ideas.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I had a lot of other nondescript jobs to make ends meet before I was able to make a living as an illustrator. I worked with young adults with physical and mental disabilities for the longest time though.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

mouse_cup_richardsmythe
©Richard Smythe – Mouse Cup

To carry on with what I’m doing and perhaps to have had a few more awards under my belt would be lovely.

What is your typical day like?

Very long. I get up around 6am and finish up about 6pm. I split my time between client work and personal development. As well as exercise and dog walking!

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

richardsmythe_foxbytheriver
©Richard Smythe – Fox By The River

I think the most enjoyable part is creating something out of nothing. The opportunity to interpret an author’s story is a great privilege to me. Picture books (if they’re good ones) can be passed down from generation to generation of kids, being cherished and loved forever. That’s a great thing to be part of. I suppose the main thing I dislike is not being paid on time, which can happen unfortunately.

How do you relax after a long day?

I like to read and do exercise, and just hang about with my family. 


You can find out more about Richard’s work on his website or through his social media accounts; Instagram and Twitter.

 

 

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Helen Parry

Watercolour Artist Helen ParryIn our second blog article on Meet the Artist, we’ve spoken to watercolour artist, Helen Parry and found out some fascinating information on her painting technique and what has inspired Helen over the years and what a typical day looks like…

When did you first discover your passion for art and painting?

I think it is something I’ve always been able to do. When I was small, I think it was the reaction of others to anything I created, that made me realise I could do something others couldn’t. At junior school whenever we did art, the other children liked my work and asked me to paint one for them to take home. They would ask me to draw all sorts of things, sometimes I think just to see if I could do it. I think they spurred me on and as I went to senior school I realised I was the only one who was aware of drawing the reflections in objects and that objects had shade to create form.

Helen Parry
©Helen Parry

Furthermore, someone gave me a book when I was young on how to mix colours. I couldn’t understand how people didn’t instinctively know how to mix colours. Again this made me realise I had a natural ability.

I think it was realising how observant I was, that I developed a need to share this with others, who seemed to miss all the detail.

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Nature is very inspiring, but I’m so observant that anything can trigger an idea. Also when you work full-time at painting, there isn’t time to wait for inspiration you just have to get on and paint.

I think that’s when I know someone is serious about art. They don’t wait for inspiration to strike, they get on with painting, trusting their creativity to shine through in the end.

How would you describe your style? 

Highly technical watercolours with fine detail brushwork. They are close to being realistic, but I don’t want my paintings to look like photographs, so there is a softness to the brushwork. 

What makes you different from other watercolour artists?

Helen Parry_Stokesay Castle GateHouse
© Helen Parry – Stokesay Castle

Firstly my paintings are not loose washes of watercolour. My watercolours have more layers of paint and fine detail brushwork too. I don’t use ready mixed watercolours. I mix all my colours from three colours a blue, a yellow and a red. I don’t use masking fluid, so all areas that are to remain white have to be carefully painted around. Also I don’t use a white paint, so all fine white hairs on leaves, flowers and even animals have to be carefully painted around. So the paper is the white, left unpainted.

Also I paint layers upon layers of watercolour, which can be difficult, because with each new layer, the under layer could wash off. It’s a balancing act.

Also I mix colours on the paper rather than in a palette, especially for portraits. I like to paint the darker undertones to a face first, which is the opposite of how you normally use watercolours (should be from light to dark). 

My technique is known as pure watercolour, but I go further by not using masking fluid and mixing my own colours from three colours. 

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to painting?

Not to try to be a perfectionist and to know when to let a painting go. It can be hard letting go of some of the detail too.

What would be your career dream?

To sell more paintings and not have to do all the promotion of my work, but have more time to paint. For my paintings to inspire people to look more closely at nature and see the wonderful detail, they overlook.

What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

I have several ideas I’d like to complete, from large scale paintings to writing stories with illustrations. 

What were you doing previously to this?

I was the financial director of an engineering company I started with my husband. 

What inspired you to go full time as an artist?

Helen Parry_Barn Owl
© Helen Parry – Barn Owl

 When you run your own business it takes every hour of your life. We ran an engineering company with a 24/7 breakdown service for many years. You don’t have time for hobbies or holidays. So as time went on, I missed being able to draw or paint or write. I missed being creative.

I saw an opportunity to help with running an after school art club at my children’s primary school. It turned out they needed someone to run it, so I went in at the deep end, finishing early at work once a week to run the art club. I ran it for two-years and it was an absolute pleasure working with the children. We created some really big projects in the school and halfway through the first year we had nearly every child at the school attending. It seemed they enjoyed it just as much as me.

It made me realise how much I’d missed painting and creating and I decided that I would pursue it as a career. It wasn’t an easy decision to make, but it was something I had to do to realise my own full potential.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years time?

I would like to have achieved more paintings, bigger projects and finally have a couple of books published. I would like to be spending more time in the hills with my backpack, painting and sketching and maybe doing talks about these painting adventures. 

What is your typical day like? 

An early morning run helps the start of my day. I run four mornings a week. It gets my mind focused for the day ahead and I always feel better for having time to myself, that no one can interrupt.

Then I start by going through emails and enquiries. I work seven days a week, so I still do this on a weekend. Next I check social media and respond to enquiries or comments. I’ll do this several times throughout the day. Then I’ll check or order art materials I need or running low on. There is a lot of paper work to sort and paintings have to be photographed and updated onto the website too.

Helen Parry_Stag in Winter
©Helen Parry – Stag in Winter

There are days when I will be out early on the hills sketching and painting composition ideas. I don’t spend a whole day out as time is precious. I tend to keep moving and sketching quickly. I will take a camera as well in case I see wildlife, they tend not to hang around long enough for me to draw.

I also have to find time in the day to do research on certain projects and identifying plants and flowers. Then I also need time for drawing out ideas for painting compositions too. I try to spend some time at the weekend writing blogs for my website as well.

The rest of my time or day is spent painting. Commission paintings take priority over other paintings, but I can have several paintings on easels at the same time. I can easily spend 8 or 9 hours a day painting, with a short break for lunch and a break for a late dinner. If I’m trying to finish a painting I will return to it, after dinner, so it could end up being a very late night. Regardless of a late night, I’m up early the next morning. 

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most? 

I love the fact I get to be creative and make my ideas a reality. I hate having to spend time promoting and doing the paperwork. 

How do you relax after a long day? 

I might sit and watch a tv show on Netflix or Amazon. I don’t have time for terrestrial television. On lighter nights through the summer, I might go for a wander up the lane or sit in the garden and watch the last rays of the sun go down.


You can keep up to date with Helen Parry’s incredible work through her social media accounts; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.

To purchase any of Helen’s work, please visit her website.