Wildlife Artist of the Year – David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation

The renowned annual Wildlife Artist of the Year competition is open again for 2019, however, you’ll have to get your entries in quick with the closing date as 5pm Monday 18th February.

This prestigious competition brings together artists, both professional and amateur, from all over the world to collaboratively celebrate the diverse beauty and wonder that the world of wildlife brings us. The competition first began in 2008 and over the years has attracted more than 10,000 entries, raising critical funds for the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation.

Upon the closing date a panel of judges will narrow down the selection for a final shortlist. All those shortlisted will be displayed at the public exhibition held at The Mall Galleries in London between the 29th May and the 2nd June 2019. Artwork will also be for sale during the exhibition.

There are seven categories in this years competition;

  • Earth’s Wild Beauty;
  • Animal Behaviour;
  • Into the Blue;
  • Urban Wildlife;
  • Vanishing Fast;
  • Wings; and
  • Human Impact

Each category winner will receive a prize of £500.

There also additional awards;

  • The Overall Winner will be awarded a prize of £10,000!
  • Second Place will be awarded a prize of £1,000.
  • People’s Choice. Each visitor to the Mall Galleries exhibition will vote for their favourite piece, subsequently, the winner will be awarded £500.
  • The Artist Award will be selected by The Artist magazine. The winner of this award will then be given a profile feature in their publication.

To enter, you must upload a digital file of your artwork to the Wildlife Artist of the Year website as a high res file. You can find full terms and conditions including more information and the entry fee on their website here. You can also view previous winners work there too. So if you’ve got a stunning piece you’ve been thinking about entering into competitions, why not give this fabulous and worthwhile competition a go?

 

 

Meet the Artist – An Interview with Richard Smythe

Richard Smythe - The Artist's Print RoomIn our latest blog article featuring  our clients, we’ve spoken to freelance illustrator, Richard Smythe. We love Richard’s adorable drawings, in particular his dancing squirrels (which you can view on his website!)

When did you first discover your passion for illustration?

From a very young age I enjoyed to draw and create things. Eventually I realised art and design came more naturally to me than other subjects at school. I remember first being commended on a drawing I did at primary school. Probably the only time I was ever praised for school work, however!

Where do you get your inspiration from and what inspires you?

Inspiration for my illustration work comes from many sources. Usually just everyday life. Whenever I see something funny or an unusual circumstance.

How would you describe your style?

richardsmythe_dogandcatadventure
©Richard Smythe – Dog & Cat Adventures

Quite loose and naive, but representational enough for young children to understand and recognise.

What makes you different from other illustrators?

It’s hard to say but it’s probably more down to how I interpret the subject matter  in the author’s manuscript. Each illustrator comes at a project differently based on their own experiences I think.

What is the most challenging thing for you when it comes to illustrating picture books?

Meeting a deadline. I normally schedule my time on a project before I start, but other things beyond my control get in the way which inevitably delay the project. If the picture book requires me to draw something unusual or complicated then this requires extra study or experimenting, which all has to be done under the time constraints of the deadline.

What would be your career dream? What project would you love to be able to do/complete?

richardsmythe_watersong
©Richard Smythe – Water Song

I honestly don’t know. I really just love what I am fortunate enough to be doing now, which is illustrating picture books for kids. I suppose it would be nice to work on some of my own stories at some stage as I always have lots of ideas.

Did you have another career prior to this? If so, what was it?

I had a lot of other nondescript jobs to make ends meet before I was able to make a living as an illustrator. I worked with young adults with physical and mental disabilities for the longest time though.

Where would you like to see yourself in 10-15 years’ time?

mouse_cup_richardsmythe
©Richard Smythe – Mouse Cup

To carry on with what I’m doing and perhaps to have had a few more awards under my belt would be lovely.

What is your typical day like?

Very long. I get up around 6am and finish up about 6pm. I split my time between client work and personal development. As well as exercise and dog walking!

What do you love the most about your job and what do you hate the most?

richardsmythe_foxbytheriver
©Richard Smythe – Fox By The River

I think the most enjoyable part is creating something out of nothing. The opportunity to interpret an author’s story is a great privilege to me. Picture books (if they’re good ones) can be passed down from generation to generation of kids, being cherished and loved forever. That’s a great thing to be part of. I suppose the main thing I dislike is not being paid on time, which can happen unfortunately.

How do you relax after a long day?

I like to read and do exercise, and just hang about with my family. 


You can find out more about Richard’s work on his website or through his social media accounts; Instagram and Twitter.